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Thursday, January 27, 2022

Taking stock of your classroom air quality

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COVID-19 brought with it new safety guidelines and strategies. And classroom air quality has topped the list of school leaders’ concerns.

With students back in physical classrooms, classroom air quality must take priority regardless of a district’s mask policy.

Join this eSchool News webinar to learn about:

  • health and safety risks associated with impure air and the need to “up our game” in classroom air purification
  • regulatory guidelines on indoor air quality and a practical guide to evaluating your present air purification system(s)
  • your peers’ experiences going through a recent upgrade to fix air quality concerns

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There’s a good chance you arched an eyebrow upon reading the headline of this article. After all, differentiation can be one of the most stressful and time-consuming parts of a teacher’s life.

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Did you know that social and emotional learning (SEL) skills can easily be taught to students in grades K-8 right alongside core academic instruction in classrooms or afterschool programs?

A 2021 study by the Council of the Great City Schools emphasizes the need for teachers to have ongoing access to high-quality professional development (PD). The study maintains that high-quality PD “must be actionable and contextualized within the framework of daily classroom life – whether those classrooms are physical, virtual, or hybrid.”

As we settle into another academic year filled with uncertainty due to the pandemic, educators are taking a deeper look into what can be learned from the tumult of the last two years.

Education institutions have remained admirably fluid over the past year and a half through the rollercoaster of remote and hybrid learning and teaching environments–scaling systems, devices, and processes for a learn-from-anywhere structure.

Across industries, ransomware and cyberattacks have proliferated in the past year, largely due to the rapid shift to remote work and school. The education sector has been hit particularly hard–the 2020 calendar year saw a record-setting 408 publicly disclosed cybersecurity incidents in the K-12 sector, according to The State of K-12 Cybersecurity: 2020 Year in Review.

As students return to their classrooms for in person learning this fall, many teachers have been reflecting on what elements of remote learning were effective, and worth maintaining in a more traditional classroom setting.

As the pandemic continues to impact another school year, a lot of focus has been on “accelerating learning,” which is about maintaining on-grade level instruction or infusing pre-requisite skills in the instruction so students can access on-grade level instruction.

Laura Ascione
Latest posts by Laura Ascione (see all)

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